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A patient who has suffered from a bone fracture can incur further injury if his or her physician does not administer proper medical care. If a patient does further injure a fractured bone due to negligent treatment by a physician by being allowed to exercise, he or she can file a medical malpractice lawsuit against any medical professionals deemed responsible and against any hospital or clinic to which he or she was admitted.

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Complications Following a Fracture

If a patient suffering from a bone fracture continues to exercise, he or she could cause additional joint damage, broken bones, bone fractures, a narrowing of bones, a concussion, neurological problems, paralysis, or permanent disability. If a physician does not provide a reasonable duty of care owed to the patient, there may be grounds for a medical malpractice lawsuit. If a patient suffering from a bone fracture is allowed to exercise by the physician in charge of his or her care, the patient has the right to file for a medical malpractice lawsuit.

Example of Fracture Negligence

A patient suffers from a fractured hip. After having the hip repaired, the patient immediately begins to walk around while the fracture is still healing because he or she was not warned to refrain from walking. The patient subsequently develops a permanent disability because of that action. Because the physician in charge did not warn the patient about the dangers of walking, the physician can be seen as liable for the further injury caused to the patient. The physician can also be held liable for any further damage done to the injury if he or she does not properly monitor the recovery of the patient. For example, if the physician fails to take additional X-rays of the fractured bone after surgery and the patient further injures him or herself, the physician can be subject to a medical malpractice lawsuit.

Legal Assistance

If a patient recovering from a bone fracture suffers from additional injuries while exercising due to the failure of a physician to properly warn or monitor their recovery, he or she should consult an attorney. Research the background of the attorney to make sure he or she is experienced in medical malpractice lawsuits dealing with bone fractures. The attorney will be able to discuss the details of medical malpractice law with the patient, as well as advise the patient on whether any lawsuit that can be filed will fall within the state’s statute of limitations. In most states a complaint or summons is required to be filed against any medical professional accused of having participated in medical malpractice before a medical malpractice lawsuit can be begun. The attorney will also be able to tell the patient whether their actions are premature, because in some instances a longer evaluation period is needed to determine whether medical malpractice in fact exists.